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15 Posts authored by: Billie Hecox

EMDK for Xamarin v2.1 Now Available

 

For details on this release, see the EMDK for Xamarin 2.1 About Page

 

Installing EMDK for Xamarin 2.1:

If you are not upgrading from EMDK for Xamarin 2.0, follow this Guide to get setup.

 

Upgrade to EMDK for Xamarin 2.1:

  1. Open your preferred IDE ( Visual Studio or Xamarin Studio)
  2. Open your IDE's Extention or Add-in Manager
    • Visual Studio -  Tools > Extensions and Updates
    • Xamarin Studio (MAC) - Xamarin Studio(menu) > Add-ins
    • Xamarin Studio (Windows)  - Tools  > Add-in Manager
  3. Look for Upgrade notification, and Install

 

NOTICE:

  • After the recent Xamarin acquisition, Microsoft has announced that the Xamarin Studio is no longer supported on Windows.  Microsoft supports only the Visual Studio for Xamarin development on Windows.  In the next EMDK for Xamarin release [v2.2], Zebra will discontinue the support for Xamarin Studio for Windows.  However, Zebra will continue to support Xamarin Studio on Mac.
  • Xamarin Studio 6.0 is not currently supported.

EMDK for Android v5.0 is now available. Find installers for this and previous releases on the EMDK Downloads page.

What's New

EMDK for Android v5.0

  • The EMDK support for ADT and Eclipse is terminated. The supported development tool now is Android Studio. Therefore all the existing Eclipse and ADT projects must be migrated to Android Studio. Please refer to the Google documentation Migrating to Android Studio for an overview of the migration process.
  • Enhanced the EMDKManager > ProfileManager to support simultaneous usage in multiple applications.
  • Added support for the MX v6.0 in the Profile Manager:
    • Clock
      • Added new feature to manage Auto Time Zone - whether to automatically acquire time zone from the network.
      • Added new feature to manage Military Time - whether to use Military (24 hour) time format.
      • Updated to allow Manual Time Zone setting when Auto Time is On.
    • Camera Manager - Some of the latest devices can now be used to take pictures using Imager. The Camera manager is enhanced to block the Imager from taking pictures.
    • Analytics Manager - Added new capability to enable or disable features such as File Upload, ANR (Application Not Respond) Info Collection, Ruggedness Info Collection, Feature Usage Info Collection, Restrict SelfUpdate WiFi Only, Device Info Collection and custom feature.
  • Enhanced the Notification Manager APIs with the following features:
    • Added support for using the pluggable External Vibrator with WT6000 device. The earlier version of EMDK Notification Manager API supported only RS6000.
    • Added new enum value "EXTERNAL_VIBRATOR1" to NotificationManager.DeviceIdentifier to specifically select External Vibrator.
    • Added new enum value "VIBRATOR" to DeviceType for External Vibrator.
    • Added new enum value "PLUGGABLE" to ConnectionType for External Vibrator. Enhanced the DeviceInfo class for determining the notification capability of RS6000 and External Vibrator.
    • Added new method isLEDSupported() to determine the support for Line Of Sight LED.
    • Added new method isBeepSupported() to determine the support for Beeping.
    • Added new method isVibrateSupported() to determine the support for Vibration.
    • Enhanced the NotificationDevice class for canceling the active notifications on the remote device.
    • Added new method cancelNotification().

 

 

For more details on this release, see the EMDK for Android 5.0 About Page

Following yesterday's announcement of the release of the WT6000. We would also like to announce that EMDK for Android 4.2 and EMDK for Xamarin 2.0 now support the WT6000 Industrial Wearable Computer!

EMDK for Android v4.2 is now available. Find installers for this and previous releases on the EMDK Downloads page.

 

Whats New in v4.2

 

Profile Manager:

  • Added support for the MX v5.1

   

  • UI Manager
    • Added new feature to set the language to localize the device to match the preferred language of the intended Device User.
    • Added new feature to enable or disable pulling down the Notification Panel.
    • Added new feature to display or hide the Settings icon in the Notification Panel.

   

  • App Manager - Added new feature to launch an application by specifying the application name.
  • Host Manager - Added new feature to set the device host name to identify device both locally and within any DNS-enabled IP-based network.
  • Bluetooth Manager - Added new feature to allow or disallow the mobile device to pair with new remote devices.
  • Analytics Manager - Added new capability to control the data captured by the analytics engine such as data transportation, type of information to collect and data collection scheduling.
  • Updated the DataCapture feature:
    • Added support for additional scanner devices:
    • Bluetooth Imager 1 (please note this value is for use with RS507 only)
    • Added support for controlling the barcode decode notifications:
    • Aim Mode - Enable/Disable scanner aim during scanning.
    • Illumination Brightness - Controls illumination brightness of the imager.

 

API:

  • Updated Barcode Manager APIs with the following features:
    • Enhanced the ScannerInfo class for the selecting the scanner:
    • Added new method getDeviceIdentifier() for selecting the scanner from the supported scanner devices. This method provides the information returned by the getConnectionType() and getDeviceType() methods in one call.

 

For more details on this release, see the EMDK for Android 4.2 About Page

EMDK for Xamarin v2.0 Now Available

 

 

New in this Release:

  • Added support for a large number of Zebra Android devices, including the TC8000!
  • Updates to EMDK Manager API's
  • New in Profile Manager
    • Support for Multiple MX versions
    • Support for Profile upgrade to higher MX version
    • Bluetooth Manager
    • Hosts Manager
    • DHCP Options Manager
  • Updates to existing Profile Manager Features
    • UI Manager
    • DataCapture
    • Wifi

For more details on this release, see the EMDK for Xamarin 2.0 About Page

 

NOTICE: Xamarin Studio 6.0 is not currently supported.

 

Installing EMDK for Xamarin 2.0:

If you are not upgrading from EMDK for Xamarin 1.0, follow this Guide to get setup.

 

 

Upgrade to EMDK for Xamarin 2.0:

  1. Open your preferred IDE ( Visual Studio or Xamarin Studio)
  2. Open your IDE's Extention or Add-in Manager
    • Visual Studio -  Tools > Extensions and Updates
    • Xamarin Studio (MAC) - Xamarin Studio(menu) > Add-ins
    • Xamarin Studio (Windows)  - Tools  > Add-in Manager
  3. Look for Upgrade notification, and Install

     Ok, by a show of hands, how many of you can put the MC40 in your right hand and power it on without using your left hand? Alright, just kidding, I can't see your hands .  But really, I just can't seem to operate that power button one-handed. Yeah, I know I could just put the device in my left hand and use my thumb to power it on, but it's still a little tricky for us right-handed folks and I end up mashing the left scan button with the palm of my hand. Is it just me or is that scan trigger on the right side below the volume buttons a perfect place to put a power button? Well, it seems someone knew I would want to do that and they included a nifty Key Programmer in the Settings menu that will let me configure what that button does.

 

     Now, with just a few taps we're all set. The MC40 can be put to sleep with the right scan trigger, and I can use my index finger to scan via the left scan trigger. Well... we're all set until a left-handed co-worker needs to use my device. Now every time they try to scan with their index finger, the device goes to sleep. Guess I will go back into settings and swap the keys around. Sure would be nice if i had a little app to swap the keys where i want them and then back if I need to hand it off? As luck would have it the EMDK has just what I need to build a little app to swap those keys around without having to dig into the settings menu. Let's spin one up.

 

     For this task, we can use the EMDK for Android or the EMDK for Xamarin, because both support the Profile Manager Key Mapping feature. At the time of this writing, only the MC18, MC40, and MC9200 running KitKat are supported, but keep an eye on the matrix of supported devices for updates.

 

     Now just load up this blog's example project and follow along. The EMDK tutorials cover the basics of how to add the EMDK to your project, use Profile Manager, and add code necessary to submit a profile. I won't cover that in this blog, but if you have any questions feel free to comment below.

 

 

After getting my project setup, I opened up Profile Manager and created a few profiles. I named one of the profiles "righthandkeymap" and the other "lefthandkeymap".

 

Screen Shot 2016-02-24 at 5.30.56 PM.png

 

In the "righthandkeymap" profile, I added two Key Mapping Manager features to the Selected Features list by selecting Key Mapping Manger on the far right, then clicked the Right arrow ( greater than symbol ).

 

In the first Key Mapping Manager feature in the selected features list I changed:

    • the Action parameter to Remap a key
    • the Choose a key to modify parameter to Button L1
    • the Key behavior parameter to Send key-code
    • the Key-code parameter to Button L1.

Keep in mind that this app was built specifically for the MC40, and that you may need to send a different KeyCode to make a button initiate a Scan. In this case, Button L1 did the trick.

 

Screen Shot 2016-02-24 at 5.31.33 PM.png

 

 

In the second Key Mapping Manager feature in the selected features list I changed:

    • the Action parameter to Remap a key
    • the Choose a key to modify parameter to Button R1
    • the Key behavior parameter to Send key-code
    • the Key-code parameter to Power.

Screen Shot 2016-02-24 at 5.31.55 PM.png

In the "lefthandkeymap" profile, I also added two Key Mapping Manager features to the Selected Features list

 

In the first Key Mapping Manager feature in the selected features list I changed:

    • the Action parameter to Remap a key
    • the Choose a key to modify parameter to Button L1
    • the Key behavior parameter to Send key-code
    • the Key-code parameter to Power.

Screen Shot 2016-02-24 at 5.32.38 PM.png

 

In the second Key Mapping Manager feature in the selected features list I changed:

    • the Action parameter to Remap a key
    • the Choose a key to modify parameter to Button R1
    • the Key behavior parameter to Send key-code
    • the Key-code parameter to Button R1.

Screen Shot 2016-02-24 at 5.32.56 PM.png

 

     After getting my profiles setup, I then added a global ProfileName variable. This is similar to how the other Profile Manager Tutorials are set up, but in this case I set it to an empty string. I then added a few buttons to the activity_main layout, labeled one of them Left, and the other one Right. Then, I set the button's OnClickListeners to update the ProfileName global with the desired profile name (lefthandkeymap for the Left button and righthandkeymap for the Right button) and then submit the profile for processing. The result was a simple User Interface to quickly swap back and forth between desired key mappings.

 

device-2016-02-24-172949.png

So the stock Android keyboard just isn't cutting it for you? The good news is that you don't have to settle for the stock keyboard. For those of you developing for a Zebra Android device that has GMS, it's a simple Google Play search for "soft keyboard" to turn up a great number of replacements.  If you don't have Google Play as an option, the Amazon App Store is a great alternative. Of course, you can always search the web for an "android soft keyboard apk". Download an APK from a reputable site and side load it.

 

Now you have a great new keyboard with big buttons, or gestures that make input a snap, but when you tap on a text field it's still that same old stock keyboard that pops up. This happens until you tell Android that you want the new keyboard to be the default keyboard, so it will pop up instead. To change the default keyboard, go into Settings > Language & Input > Default and select the new keyboard.

 

Now you are all set on a single device. What if you have a hundred devices to install this great new keyboard on? The manual process of installing the apk and touching your way through the settings menu will take quite a bit of time. In many cases, you would employ a device staging tool like StageNow, or an MDM to install the keyboard apk and set the default keyboard.  If a staging tool or an MDM is not an option, then the EMDK may just have a solution for you. With the EMDK Profile Manager and ProfileManger APIs, you can create an app that will install your APK and set it as the default keyboard.

 

Creating a project that uses Profile Manager to submit a profile has been covered multiple times in the EMDK Documentation, so I will just jump straight to setting up the profile.  If you have not been through one yet, I would suggest starting with the Clock Manager Tutorial, it covers all the basics needed to submit a profile.

 

In Profile Manager create a new Profile named "KeyboardProfile-1"

KeyboardProfile-1.png

 

Now add Profile Features App Manager and UI Manager

If you have installed the keyboard through the Play Store or Amazon App store, you can skip the apk install via App Manager

 

- For App Manager, set the Action to Install, and then APK Path Name to the path where you have placed the apk on the devices file system.

 

- For UI Manager:

  • Change Set default input method? to Change Current input Method
  • Change Select a default input Method Option to User defined Input Method
  • Set Package name of input Method to the Package name of the new keyboard i.e. com.example.android.softkeyboard
  • Set Class name of input Method to the Class name of the new keyboard i.e. com.example.android.softkeyboard.SoftKeyboard

 

UIManager.png

 

In the example project for this Tip, I used a keyboard built by compiling a SoftKeyboard sample project provided by Google. This made the process of finding Package name and Class name a cinch.  Finding these values for a keyboard you installed from the Play store, Amazon or a sideloaded APK may be a chore all on its own.  Once you have the keyboard installed, finding the package name can be done via ADB using the command "adb shell pm list packages -f", but finding the Class Name may be much harder.  My suggestion would be to try to contact the developer or company that created the keyboard and ask for this info. There are other methods that involve deconstructing an APK, but I will not cover that here.

 

Now all you need to do is copy your apk to your device's file system ( if you did not install from the Play Store or Amazon ) and have your app submit KeyboardProfile-1 for processing. If all went well, your new keyboard should pop up when you select a text entry field.

 

Download the Example project for this Tip

EMDK for Android v4.0 is now available. Find installers for this and previous releases on the EMDK Downloads page.

 

Whats New in v4.0

  • New Profile Manager Features
    • Multipule MX version support - Profile manager now supports multiple MX versions. You can now choose between MX 4.2, 4.4 and 5.0 when creating a new profile.
    • Profile Upgrade - Profile manager now provides a method to upgrade an existing profile to use a higher version of MX.
    • Data Capture Activity Selection Wildcard - When using an Activity Selector in a Data Capture profile and wish to include all activities in an application package, you no longer have to manually enter each activity. You can now enter a single asterisk ( * ) and all activities in that package will be selected.
    • New MX 4.4 features
      • Additional Locale support for SPANISH, US_SPANISH, BRAZILIAN PORTUGUESE and PORTUGUESE.
      • Password Masking / Encryption for sensitive values in Certificate Manager and GPRS Manager.
    • New MX 5.0 features
      • PAC File – Allows the central control of proxy settings for KitKat devices
      • Screen Capture Control – Enable / Disable ability to perform a screen capture
      • Vendor Specific DHCP Options – Supports vendor specific options for granular configuration control
  • New API's
  • Mobile Payment - Provides API's to perform EMV and Magstripe Payment transactions when using the PD40 Payment device with MC40 JB, TC70 KK, TC75 KK and TC55 KK devices.
  • Serial Communication - Allows you to add DEX support in your application.

 

IDE Support

  • Support for ADT/Eclipse has been deprecated. Future versions of the EMDK for Android will only support Android Studio for development.

 

Documentation

Announcing the release of The EMDK for Xamarin version 1.0


The EMDK for Xamarin provides developers with a comprehensive set of tools to easily create powerful line of business applications for Android enterprise mobile computing devices while retaining their C# skills and tools. The EMDK for Xamarin includes class libraries, sample applications with source code, as well as all of the associated documentation to help your applications take full advantage of what our devices have to offer.

 

You can now build your EMDK applications using Microsoft Visual Studio or Xamarin Studio on Windows. We also support EMDK development on Mac using the Xamarin Studio. Leveraging IDE extensions we have pulled all the tools you need into Visual Studio and Xamarin Studio.  Profile Manager, Device Runtime Install, documentation and sample apps are only a click away.

 

menu-emdk.jpg

 

Learn more about this release, and get your development environment setup by checking out our EMDK for Xamarin documentation.   

An issue has been found with the EMDK when using a recent release of Android Studio ( v 1.3 )

When using the New Project Wizard in this version of Android studio, you will not find the EMDK listed as an option for the Minimum SDK. Even if they are listed as installed in the Android SDK manager.


newapp.pngsdkmanager.png

A resolution to this issue is currently being worked on, but in the meantime the following instructions will walk you through manually configuring a new project where  Android API 16 or 19 was selected as the Minimum SDK

 

Configure New Project:


1. Create a new project, and set the Minimum SDK as API 16 or 19

2. Go to File > Project Structure

3. Select app in the left-pane and Properties tab.

4. Manually enter one of the following add-on names in the “Compile Sdk Version” depending on the API version (see below):

SDK add-on (API 16) name: Symbol Technologies, Inc.:EMDK 3.1 (API 16):16
SDK add-on (API-19) name: Symbol Technologies, Inc.:EMDK 3.1 (API 19):19

     img

 

 

     img

 

5. Click OK then Select Yes in the resulting dialog.

 

Your project is now ready for EMDK development (see EMDK Help for more information on creating an EMDK app).

 



An issue has been found in the sample provided with the EMDK 3.1 Update1 installer. The ProfileWirelessManager Sample app distributed with the Update1 installer may not work correctly on a device that has the Update1 device runtime installed.  A replacement Sample app that works correctly with the latest device runtime can be downloaded here

An update for EMDK v3.1 is now available for download. To install the update you must first have the full EMDK v3.1 installed. Find the Update installer at https://developer.motorolasolutions.com/community/android/emdk/downloads

 

Whats New

This update brings five new profile features, two new APIs and support for 3 more devices.

 

New Profile Features:

  • Audio Volume UI Manager - This feature allows the developer to modify various UI elements in a devices Audio settings menu.
  • Battery Manager -  This feature allows the developer to set the number of charge cycles a Smart or Gifted battery can accumulated before being flagged for replacement.
  • Component Manager - This profile feature allows the developer to control usage of a devices Ethernet port.
  • DHCP Option Manager -  This profile feature allows the developer to set various DHCP client options for a device.
  • Key Mapping Manger - This profile feature allows the developer to remap the behavior a key will exhibit when pressed.

 

 

New APIs

  • Personal Shopper APIs - This API allows the developer to control the MC18 smart cradle, and retrieve diagnostic information such as battery capacity.
  • Secure NFC - This API provides encryption for nfc transactions and provides support for MifareDesfire tags.


New Devices

  • MC18 KitKat
  • MC40 KitKat
  • MC92 KitKat

     Well, Google I/O has been over for a week now, I'm just now finding the time to watch the keynote.  Lots of great announcements for Android development in general, but here are some highlights of what to expect with Android M.

 

Permissions System

     As of now, the permissions we developers ask for in our Apps, are presented to the user during installation. The user must agree to the complete list of permissions we request, or they wont be able to complete the install. Permissions in Android M will be handled differently. The user will not be prompted to accept all permissions during install. Instead, when the user attempts to use a feature in the application that requires permission, they will be prompted to accept, or simply not use that feature. Not only will the user be able to grant permission, but also revoke permission through the App Manager in Settings.   Legacy applications targeting API's prior to "M", will behave has they always have (prompt during install).

 

Power Management

     A new power management feature called Doze, will monitor your devices sensors for inactivity, and use fewer background services while Dozing. Providing the potential for 2x the battery life. Android M will also support USB Type-C.

 

Chrome Custom Tabs

     When the need to display web content in our App arises, we currently have 2 options. Send the user out of your App, into their default browser, or implement a Webview. Chrome Custom Tabs allow the developer to skin the tab so it will look like the rest of your App, and prefetch web content so it will be ready before the user launches the tab. Since this is actually Chrome running, and not a Webview, all accounts that have been setup in chrome will be available in the Custom Tab.

 

Android Pay

     Pay will use NFC and a Virtual Card Number to complete a pay transaction, never passing your actual card number on to the merchant. A new Finger print scanner API will allow for quick payments without launching an App, just unlock your phone with your finger print, tap and go. Pay will be available in thousands of retailers when released.

We are pleased to announce the release of The EMDK for Android version 3.1. In this version, we're introducing support for new KitKat devices, a new API for Simulscan, updates to existing Data Capture API's, and a ton of new Profile Manager features.

 

EMDK application development in Android Studio under Windows is now fully supported, as well as, continued support for Eclipse. By performing a few manual installation steps, this version of the EMDK adds full support for Android studio under Mac. A full Mac installer will be added in the next EMDK version.


For a complete list of new features, check out the updated EMDK About Page. Download the new release from the EMDK Downloads Page, and get started using the new features right away by making use of all of our new tutorials.

Overview

The purpose of this document is to outline the steps needed to integrate the Symbol EMDK for Android into Android Studio, walk through the available methods in which you can add the EMDK library to your Android Studio project, and explain how to import the current Eclipse based EMDK sample projects into Android Studio.

The manual EMDK integration process is only temporary and will not be necessary after an installer for Android Studio has been completed.

Prerequisites

The following items must be installed before setting up Android Studio for EMDK development.

Make a note of the name and location where you install “Android Studio” and “Android SDK” on your system, you will need to refer to the Android SDK directory later when integrating EMDK for Android.

Setting up Android Studio for EMDK for Android development

EMDK SDK add-on Integration

Perform the following steps to make the EMDK available to Android API levels 16 & 19

  1. Locate the EMDK for Android installation root directory (default: C:\Program Files (x86)\Symbol EMDK for Android)

  2. Locate the Android SDK installation directory previously noted (default: C:\Users\xxx\ AppData\Local\Android\sdk)

  3. Copy the SDK add-ons from EMDK to Android SDK as mentioned below:

    Source: “…\Symbol EMDK for Android\v3.0\Integrator\add-ons\*.\”

    Destination: “…\Android\sdk\add-ons”

  4. Launch Android Studio

  5. Go to Tools > Android > SDK Manager

Now the integrated EMDK add-ons should appear in the SDK Manager:

img

EMDK Profile Manager Plug-in Integration

Perfom the following steps to integrate the EMDK Profile Manager into Android Studio’s Menu bar.

  1. Locate the Android Studio installation directory previously noted (default: C:\Program Files\Android\Android Studio)

  2. Download the “com.symbol.emdkplugin.zip” archive.

  3. Extract the archive.

  4. Copy the EMDK Wizard plugin into Android Studio as mentioned below:

    Source: com.symbol.emdkplugin”

    Destination: “…\Android Studio\plugins” (e.g.: “C:\Program Files\Android\Android Studio\plugins”)

  5. Exit & Launch Android Studio.

Now the EMDK menu should appear in the Android Studio menu bar.

img

EMDK for Android development with Android Studio

In order to enable EMDK development in your project, you must first add the EMDK library. The EMDK for Android library can be added to your project via one of the following three methods.

Specify the EMDK SDK add-on as the “Minimum SDK” in the New Android Studio Project wizard

  1. Launch Android Studio

  2. Select “Start a new Android Studio project” or File > New Project.

  3. Enter “Application name” and “Company Domain” and Click Next

  4. Select EMDK SDK add-on (ex: “Symbol Technologies, Inc.: EMDK API (16)”) as the “Minimum SDK” under Phone and Tablet.

    img

  5. Complete the New project Wizard by Clicking Next > Next > Finish

    Android Studio will display your project when Gradle build process is complete.

To verify that the EMDK has been added to your project.

  1. Go to File > Project Structure.

  2. Click on app under Modules in the Project Structure Window’s left-pane.

  3. Check the value of “Compile Sdk Version”. It should be the selected EMDK SDK add-on (see below)

Symbol Technologies, Inc.:EMDK 3.0 (API 16):16

Symbol Technologies, Inc.:EMDK 3.0 (API 19):19

img

Another method to verifiy EMDK project integration is via the build.gradle file.

Open build.gradle (Module: app) from the left-pane. The compileSdkVersion should be assigned to EMDK SDK add-on.

img

Your project is now ready for EMDK development (see EMDK Help for more information on creating an EMDK app).

Import EMDK lib JAR as a Module

Starting with a previously created Project with a minimum API level of 16 or 19

  1. Go to File > Project Structure

  2. Press the button marked with “+” at the top-left to add a new module.

  3. Select “Phone and Tablet Application”.

  4. Select “Import JAR or AAR Package” from the list More Modules then Click Next

  5. Click Browse button and locate the EMDK jar file (com.symbol.emdk.jar) from the SDK add-on folder and click OK

    img

    The new module will eventualy appear in the left-pane of the project structure window.

  6. Click on app in left-pane and select the dependencies tab

    img

  7. Press the button marked with the “+” at top-right to add select “Module Dependency”.

    img

  8. Select “com.symbol.emdk” from the “Choose modules” dialog then Press OK.

  9. The new dependency should be listed, now Press OK

    img

Your project is now ready for EMDK development (see EMDK Help for more information on creating an EMDK app).

Add EMDK SDK add-on name as the “Compile Sdk Version” in Project Structure

Starting with a previously created Project with a minimum API level of 16 or 19.

  1. Go to File > Project Structure

  2. Select app in the left-pane and Properties tab.

  3. Manually enter one of the following add-on names in the “Compile Sdk Version” depending on the API version (see below):

    SDK add-on (API 16) name: Symbol Technologies, Inc.:EMDK 3.0 (API 16):16

    SDK add-on (API-19) name: Symbol Technologies, Inc.:EMDK 3.0 (API 19):19

    img

  4. Click OK then Select Yes in the resulting dialog.

    img

Your project is now ready for EMDK development (see EMDK Help for more information on creating an EMDK app).

Importing EMDK Samples into Android Studio

Starting at the Android Studio Welcome Screen, Select “Import Non-Android Studio project”

  1. Locate the EMDK Samples path.

    For example:  “C:\Users\Public\Symbol EMDK for Android\v3.0\Samples\ADT”.

  2. Select the preferred sample, and press OK.

    img

  3. Click Next and then Finish to complete the import wizard.

    When Android Studio has completed the Gradle build, your sample project will be displayed.

  4. From the Build menu, select Rebuild Project.

    img

  5. Connect a Symbol Android device via USB, and select Run from the Run menu.

    img

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