Please post your customers who asked about iPhone support

The more specific the better...
For example it would be good to know
-how many lines they plan to purchase
-whether these are additional lines or replacement to existing devices
-what is their timeline, will they wait a year until we have a solution?
Scott Davenport
RTI How many iPhones

RTI



  1. How many iPhones do you plan on purchasing? Unsure - but more than 10
  2. Are these additional or replacement devices? Replacement devices
  3. What is your timeline? 1 – 3 months

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Jeff Jones
E&Y: 1. How many iPhones do

E&Y:
1. How many iPhones do you plan on purchasing? 10 on the C-level alone; could be a total of up to 200
2. Are these additional or replacement devices? Additional
3. What is your timeline? Now

Note: not having an iPhone client has slowed our entry into this customer.

Geico:
1. How many iPhones do you plan on purchasing? More than 30
2. Are these additional or replacement devices? Both
3. What is your timeline? Now.

Note: Geico is enabling Direct Push to accommodate their user requests to use the iPhone
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John Scaletta
Arch Coal reached out to me

Arch Coal reached out to me about the IPhone.  Below are the responses

1. How many iPhones do you plan on purchasing? There is a high interest. Initially we would prefer Goodlink support on them prior to deploying to the masses; but I have at least 20 people who want the first one. If the product did work with Goodlink, that number would go higher.
2. Are these additional or replacement devices? Some are replacements; but we anticipate additional users who will require this device
3. What is your timeline? When the product goes live in July; I’ve had senior management inquiring for the past two months and have received a few emails since the announcement on Monday. We would be willing to be a beta tester of the client for Goodlink.
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John Scaletta
PSSI Global Services LLC -

PSSI Global Services LLC - 5585644
Yes, we are a Good customer.





  1. Not sure, maybe a few.

  2. Replacement.

  3. ASAP.

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John Scaletta
I haved asked Inside Sales to

I haved asked Inside Sales to gather this info and I agreed to post


Prudential California Realty




1. How many iPhones do you plan on purchasing?


12


2. Are these additional or replacement devices?


Replacements


3. What is your timeline?


July

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John Scaletta
1. How many iPhones do you

1. How many iPhones do you plan on purchasing? Already have 15 iPhones. 20 CALs on Good server would switch to iPhone if supported.


2. Are these additional or replacement devices? Both


3. What is your timeline? July 11th next mn time frame.



Mike Preisman


Chief Financial Officer


Managed Maintenance, Inc.


791 Park of Commerce Blvd. #200


Boca Raton, FL 33487

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Thomas Buxton
  Customer 20th Century Fox -

  Customer 20th Century Fox - Bill Walker

1. How many iPhones do you plan on purchasing? currently have 10 but demand is high


2. Are these additional or replacement devices? Both



3. What is your timeline? When 3G iPhone becomes available

In process of enabling Microsoft Direct push in order to support iPhone.  Customer has large deployment of BB


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Thomas Buxton
  Associated Press - Steve

  Associated Press - Steve Christie

1. How many iPhones do you plan on purchasing? 50 +


2. Are these additional or replacement devices? Both



3. What is your timeline? Once 3G iPhone is available

Customer would prefer to utilize GMM for enterprise mail and security but have to enable Microsoft Direct Push in order to support demand from field and managment. 

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Thomas Buxton
Partners Healthcare - Ben

Partners Healthcare - Ben Ndrenika
 

1. How many iPhones do you plan on purchasing? 20+ demand is growing


2. Are these additional or replacement devices? Both



3. What is your timeline? Already testing Microsoft Direct Push would prefer GMM since already approved and deployed.


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Thomas Buxton
GE Consumer and Appliances -

GE Consumer and Appliances -   Jeff Tretter

 

1. How many iPhones do you plan on purchasing? Demand is high only have a few today but will grow with 3G iphone availability


2. Are these additional or replacement devices? Both



3. What is your timeline? Actively exploring no timeline.


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Efren Carattini
Not a lot of details but on a

Not a lot of details but on a roadmap presentation for Verizon Business (2 months ago) they stated that, internally, their ranking for mobile OS's/devices was as follows:



  1. RIM

  2. WinMo until iPhone supports some level of enterprise capabilities. They expressed that WinMo was seen as just a temporary alternative and that demand for it was weak (amongst internal users). iPhone demand was expected to exceed requests for WinMo over time.

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John Scaletta
Company - Transammonia  -

Company - Transammonia  - Josh Drucks account


 



1. How many iPhones do you plan on purchasing?  100.  The $200 pricepoint is killer


2. Are these additional or replacement devices? Both


3. What is your timeline? Now - the 3G ones

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Efren Carattini
This is from Deloitte Mexico:

This is from Deloitte Mexico:



  1. How many iPhones do you plan on purchasing? Estimate that 20% to 30% of user base will use them

  2. Are these additional or replacement devices? Both

  3. What is your timeline? End of year

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John Scaletta
Cooper Health 1. How many

Cooper Health


1. How many iPhones do you plan on purchasing? – All of our doctors like their new toys, the article below was actually forwarded by a doctor. I would say once it’s known that we can have them the numbers will grow significantly. We already had 20+ requests to forward email to users iPhones which we had to turn them down.


2. Are these additional or replacement devices? Would imagine that would be both


3. What is your timeline? Near future…..What is Motorola’s Timeline?

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John Scaletta
Posting - Wachovia is one of

Posting - Wachovia is one of our customers


Selling big business on the iPhone



Apple is taking a new, corporate-friendly tack with the iPhone. Will it work?


By Jon Fortt and Michal Lev-Ram


Ju (Fortune) -- Steve Jobs has won over legions of new customers since he returned to Apple, but one key group has stubbornly eluded him: big business.


The reason isn't a mystery. Apple's mercurial CEO decided a decade ago that corporate IT departments weren't worth the trouble. Though they buy tech gear by the truckload, when it comes to computers they often favor stripped-down, predictable technology - the stuff Jobs finds boring. Rather than chase that business, he has courted upscale consumers with innovative devices like the iMac and iPod that are as fashionable as they are functional. It's hard to argue with the results: Apple stock is up more than 2,000 percent in the last 10 years.


But now as Jobs seeks to turbocharge sales of the 3G iPhone, he'll have no choice but to embrace the corporate stiffs. That's because while Apple's computer and iPod sales are healthy, analysts believe the popular smartphone has the most growth potential - and business buyers could be the key to its success.


Can Apple (AAPL, Fortune 500) do it? With its strong brand and balance sheet, experts say now might be the perfect time to try. But the real question is whether Apple is willing to put the money and time into the humdrum work of treating businesses like first-class customers.


Chasing the road warriors


In the iPhone's realm, the most coveted customers are road warriors who read e-mail, surf the web, and handle multimedia files on the go. To date, most of them have embraced Research in Motion's (RIMM) BlackBerry, and devices running software from Microsoft (MSFT, Fortune 500) or Symbian. But investors, believing that the iPhone can steal those customers away, have recently bid up Apple's stock. Analysts believe the company can sell between 20 million and 45 million units worldwide next year.


Mark Tauschek, an analyst with Info-Tech Research Group, notes that though business buyers make up only 30 percent of phone users, they spend the most money. "To reach these lofty goals they have to make the leap to enterprise sales," he says. "That's where most of the pickup is."


There are already signs Apple is warming to businesses. The latest version of the iPhone, which is due to go on sale July 11, doesn't come in retail-friendly candy colors; instead, it's packed with features right off an IT manager's wish list: tighter security, support for Microsoft Exchange and Office, and software tools that let businesses roll their own custom applications, to name a few.


The new capabilities are enough to get Apple's handpicked group of outside corporate testers excited about the device; 35 percent of the Fortune 500, including Bank of America (BAC, Fortune 500), Morgan Stanley (MS, Fortune 500), Disney (DIS, Fortune 500) and Genentech (DNA), signed up to try out the software and tell Apple how to make it better. "Everything they told us they wanted we have built into iPhone 2.0 software out of the box," Jobs said when he unveiled it this month.


But now that they've tested it, will they buy? We won't know for several months. Wachovia (WB, Fortune 500) technology chief Jim Ditmore expects to include the iPhone among the devices employees can use for e-mail by October.


At Wells Fargo (WFC, Fortune 500), Steve Ellis, executive VP of wholesale services, notes that workers can't wait to get their hands on iPhones - he says he fielded two dozen employee e-mails the day Apple unveiled the business features. But while Ellis says he found Apple wonderful to work with, he acknowledges that winning over other IT managers could be a challenge for a company used to wowing consumers. "Enterprise is kind of a new thing for them."


The Apple attitude


Gartner analyst Ken Dulaney puts it more bluntly. "Apple's reputation's not good. Most of the companies I talk to say that when they bring the Apple rep in, the first thing he says is, 'Why should we work with you?' Not the kinds of practices that endear you to the enterprise."


And while Apple's dramatic product unveilings may thrill consumers and the press, they just annoy businesses, which prefer to plan for new technology well in advance. Apple's decision to build all iPhones itself and offer U.S. service exclusively through AT&T has Gartner recommending that clients avoid using specially developed iPhone software and stick with e-mail, calendar and contacts. That way, if relations with Apple or AT&T (T, Fortune 500) go sour, they can easily switch to something like BlackBerry or Microsoft.


That may sort-of defeat the purpose of getting an iPhone - but businesses can't afford to put all their eggs in one basket. Says Dulaney: "The iPhone does have a place in the enterprise. It just might not be as broad as something like Windows Mobile."


Given all the hype around the iPhone's advanced features, that seems an odd statement - but it reflects the skeptical tone several experts struck about Apple's chances of storming corporate America. Companies in highly visual industries like insurance and media might take a chance on the iPhone early. But others will hang back to see whether they can get by with phones from companies whose products and customer service they're used to working with already.


If Apple has a grand plan to beef up its customer service and overcome those perceptions, it isn't sharing. (An Apple spokesman declined to comment beyond what the company has publicly stated about its plans.) But the company has plenty of options. A cash stash of nearly $20 billion gives Jobs the resources to buy a top-notch service organization if he chooses. The company's AppleCare program for consumer service is highly rated, and he could expand it for business.


In a pinch, Jobs could also rely on wireless carrier partners to take the lead in sales and support. In the U.S., AT&T seems eager to fill that role. The carrier is the top seller of the BlackBerry and Windows Mobile smartphones, and has promised to "aggressively" sell the iPhone "to more than 120,000 companies - including all of the Fortune 1000" when it arrives on July 11, according to company spokesman Brad Mays.


But Jobs is apparently not content to let AT&T handle everything. Though AT&T says it will be the "point person" for business customers, its tech support teams are responsible only for dealing with network service issues for the iPhone. For all hardware and software problems - such as dead batteries or cracked touchscreens - customers will have to make an extra call to Apple. That's different from the way AT&T deals with RIM and other hardware makers; for them, it handles all customer contact and brings in the device maker to make fixes behind the scenes.


"We're evaluating this [arrangement], and if it seems to make sense for us to take on some of the responsibility on the device side as well, we would be open to doing that," says Jeff Bradley, senior vice president of small business mobility marketing and operations at AT&T.


Grass roots campaign?


Even though Apple hasn't charted a detailed corporate strategy, no one's counting the company out. Even its critics say the combination of well-designed software and popular hardware could be hard to resist.


Al Delattre, global managing director of Accenture's (ACN) electronics and high technology business practice, predicts that the iPhone could get a foothold in corporations as employees simply bring them in, one by one, and pressure their IT departments to make sure they work with corporate systems.


But it will take something extra for Apple to make a real impact. "All the major handset providers, if they want to play at the enterprise level, have got to have absolutely bulletproof, ironclad, global, 24-7 support," Delattre says.


If Apple means business, that's what needs to happen. To top of page

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John Scaletta
RKMC - 5586075 1. How many

RKMC - 5586075


1. How many iPhones do you plan on purchasing? possibly up to 100


2. Are these additional or replacement devices? both


3. What is your timeline? ASAP

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Kevin Wai
UCLA 1. How many iPhones do

UCLA

1. How many iPhones do you plan on purchasing?  20

2. Are these additional or replacement devices?  10 new

3. What is your timeline?  5 months
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Jeff Jones
Deutsche Bank 1. How many

Deutsche Bank

1. How many iPhones do you plan on purchasing?  200

2. Are these additional or replacement devices? all new

3. What is your timeline?  now
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Kevin Wai
Tiburon Inc1. How many

Tiburon Inc

1. How many
iPhones do you plan on purchasing?
Less than 10

2. Are
these additional or replacement devices? 

Additional

3. What is
your timeline?

ASAP

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