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IN THIS ISSUE: GitHub Co-Pilot for VS2022; Mozilla's Future Vision; Chrome Reaches 100; Mdash Works Well With Others; Role of Satellites in the Enterprise; Linux Flaw Found, Fixed

GIF demonstrating how to adjust Copilot settings from Visual Studio

GitHub CoPilot Available for Visual Studio 2022

In a blog post last week, Microsoft-owned GitHub announced that GitHub Co-Pilot is now available to developers using Visual Studio 2022 who are also part of its technical preview program. Devs must sign up for the program to gain access to the code prediction tool.

 

Firefox Maker Proclaims its Future Vision

While the relative upstart Chrome enjoys a commanding lead in worldwide browser market share, Mozilla declares its lofty vision of internet openness, agency and safety that one hopes will rub off on the others; Firefox browser usage is barely a blip on the radar today.

 

Chrome Browser Reaches 100

For Google's Chrome browser, reaching its 100th version as its 14th birthday approaches means that browser years are just slightly greater than dog years. While it's mostly about bug fixes, users of the latest Chrome for Android might miss the "Lite" version, which is removed.  

 

Mdash Components Work Well With Others

Developers that work in large companies know the scenario well. They've been surprised with the news that their latest web components, released yesterday, have to integrate with those of several other departments by next week. Mdash claims to solve this with pure HTML. 

 

Starlink - Wikipedia

Role of Satellites in the Enterprise

As the constellation of satellites circling the Earth grows like a cosmic weed, communications companies continue to find new ways to use them. One of the latest leverages AI to mate IoT with edge computing to spawn bandwidth as a service. Sidenote: This amazing website helps spot satellites in the sky. 

 

Linux Flaw Found, Fixed

Like a fire at the fire station, a security hole in a security tool can apparently present unusual problems. Reported last week, a California grad student came across a major flaw in IPSec that can be exploited to inflate local privileges.